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babyeater
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Sat Sep 22, 2012 2:22 pm

I just wrote up a shortish blurb about women and weight lifting for my blog; thought I'd submit it here:

Title: "What Women Need to Understand About Getting Into Strength Training"
author: Janis Finkelman
Text:

I am sometimes asked for my views regarding how women new to strength training can successfully get into the activity and potentially compete at a chosen strength sport. Because I am a powerlifter, I will write specifically in reference to that sport, but the following ideas can be applied to the participation of women in other strength sports as well. My first response to questions regarding how I navigate being a woman in a male-dominated activity is one of negation– I very specifically try NOT to think of the gender difference between myself and those who train for powerlifting who are not women. I advocate the idea that to reach a true sense of equity between the sexes amongst those who powerlift, attention to gender should be minimal beyond sex and weight class delineations. The minute I stop focusing on my gender while I’m in a gym surrounded by many men and few women is the minute I free myself of all the baggage and considerations tied to gender that might complicate the way I think about myself in relation to my lifting.

This is not easy. If you’re a woman and new to strength training, it is likely that you will lift in a gym with an unequal ratio of male-to-female lifters and you will notice this. Those around you will notice it. It is up to you to decide how the attention of others makes you feel. No one can make you insecure about your efforts in the gym but you. This seems like an oversimplification of the matter, but it is an oversimplification that will serve you well if you learn to believe it. I have not achieved the kind of enlightenment that comes from believing this sentiment all the time–every gym session, every lift, every rest period, I only manage to divorce myself from my own awareness of others’ awareness of me some of the time. The more I demand of myself that I rise above my self-doubt and the hesitation and insecurity that comes from thinking about what others are thinking, the more I train myself to truly overcome whatever trepidation I might hold about being a minority amongst a majority.

There are those who will brashly assert that they never care what others are thinking when they are lifting in the gym. This may be true, and I am happy for them if it is. Chances are, however, women new to strength training will not hold this mindset, or will only be able to hold it for small amounts of time as they perform their workout. To those women, I say persevere. Every time you go into the gym believing that you have a right to be there and that your gender has little to nothing to do with training your body for strength, you train your mind towards a greater sense of self-confidence and self-possession.

I cannot imagine what my lifting landscape would look or feel like if I lifted in an environment dominated by other female lifters. I have been lifting in gyms in which over 20 men are working around me for several years now, and asserting my space amongst them has been an ongoing project. Getting yourself to the point at which you truly do not mind or think about the difference in gender between you and the lifters around you is one that often takes time. Ultimately, you want to be in a place in which you barely consider how your strength compares to the men around you because you know that considering strength relative to size is how to truly compare strength levels between one person and another. You want to be in a place in which you are able to fully concentrate on your body and the bar with which you are working without thinking about how your body is sexually identified, because the bar doesn’t care which sex you are. It is that simple. You are responsible for how you feel in any situation, be it strength-training or otherwise, and no one else can determine this for you. You can choose to feel the eyes of others on you or you can choose to dismiss this sensation. The more you practice dismissing it, the easier it will be. Lifting will give you confidence, but not without some work on your part. Go into the gym knowing what you may face psychologically and how to rise above it. Training knows no gender.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Sat Sep 22, 2012 2:53 pm

I've got one too; give Babyeater's blog post a few days before you consider posting mine:

“Be Crazy and Take Risks like the Hells Angels”: The Fallacy of the Trained Athlete
By Kyle Keough

While perusing the internet last night, I came across a little gem of an article from Jeff Passan, a Yahoo! Sports editor, that chronicles the very asinine training protocol for the Pittsburgh Pirates’ minor-league system. If you haven’t already come across said article, I’d highly recommend you take a gander here: http://sports.yahoo.com/news/pirates---hells-angels-----navy-seals--minor-league-training-methods-become-mlb-joke--.html.

The Pirates are admittedly an outlier in the bizarre world of strength and conditioning; their methods, extreme by any standard, harken back to the myth of reprogramming vis-à-vis intense psycho-physiological training, a myth twinged with military fetishism. And if you think this myth has subsided in lieu of a more scientific approach to athletic training, think again. As an inhabitant of Iowa City, land o’ the Kirk Ferentz coach’s challenge, I speak on behalf of a city that helped--for a short while, at least--introduce the sporting country to the affliction “rhabdo” by asking its football players to squat fifty-percent of their bodyweight one-hundred times…while being timed.

The physiological benefits for such a training session were difficult to surmise even before thirteen Iowa football players were left pissing blood: a hundred repetitions exceeds every beneficial repetition range—even past the point of meaningful hypertrophy work—and becomes pure aerobic conditioning. Believe it or not, there are better ways to develop one’s aerobic capacities than with barbell back squats—I know this goes against the church of CrossFit, but at the risk of alienating part of that parish, I have to come out and say it.

So, then, why does a Division-I football program—one headed by a reputable strength-and-conditioning coach in Chris Doyle—employ such corporeally destructive, and therefore not at all effective, methods for training its athletes? Well, the answer’s a complicated one. It begins with a meddling football coach; this individual has no business advising his S&C staff on how to train the team’s athletes, but he does so, anyway. He does this because he believes in the psychological benefits of “grueling” training; the fallacy of “training harder, not smarter” is perpetuated in spades by the machismo-fueled world of male athletics programs.

But no one has in such an extravagant manner trumpeted their own stupidity before a certain Pittsburgh Pirates GM wrote a response about his system’s unorthodox training methods by emploring his athletes to “be crazy and take risks like the Hells’ Angels.” And the Pirates do just that by orchestrating the most idiotically unscientific training protocols in the Major Leagues. That, by itself, is an achievement.

I must make clear that I’m not writing this to poo-poo the stupidity of such training practices; I write this instead to warn athletes against the fallacy of the trained athlete. It’s become trite to say, but the maxim, “athletes succeed in spite of their training, not because of it” has some validity to it.

An athlete does not have a good strength and conditioning program simply because they’re a high-level or even a professional athlete. Though one typically coincides with the other, athletes succeed in spite of poort strength-and-conditioning programming because they do a tremendous amount of sport-specific training. In other words, an athlete who simply practices his or her sport more than her competitors can afford to make mistakes elsewhere in training.

The fallacy of the trained athlete is a dangerous pitfall for newcomers because these individuals assume that what works for so-and-so will work for them, not realizing that hand-to-hand combat is NOT the reason behind Andrew McCutchen’s surge in home-run power this year. In fact, one has nothing to do with the other.

For those of you just starting out remember the following two pieces of advice, and make them your mantras:

1. Keep it simple, stupid. “KISS” remains among the most important pieces of advice for new lifters and new athletes. If you’re new to any sport, sport-specific training is invaluable.

In other words, if you’re a beginner in a particular sport, practice as often as possible. If that sport’s powerlifting, choose a program that involves a considerable amount of sport-specific training, or one that will contribute to specific physical preparedness development. That means squatting, bench-pressing, and deadlifting.

2. Train optimally. You don’t need to train ‘like’ anyone else. You’re at a different stage in your development, with different strengths and weaknesses. Training must be individualized, and the process of individualizing one’s training is called training optimally. Training more often—or training harder—is not necessarily better, and oftentimes it can be detrimental to an athlete’s progression. The same absolutely goes for a beginning lifter: I’ve had beginners ask me how I train to reach an Elite standard in powerlifting, then inform me that they’ll now be switching from training four days a week to seven days a week, with five of those being heavy-intensity sessions. Not only does this miss the fact that it took me years to reach this point in my development, it’s also dangerously stupid.

In short, don’t feed into the fallacy of the trained athlete: being crazy and taking risks like the Hells’ Angels does not a high-level athlete make.


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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Sat Sep 22, 2012 8:38 pm

Train the bottom to strengthen the top

"Man, I keep on failing my bench at the top. I need to strengthen my triceps. I think I'm going to start working on my two-board press." This is a very common thing to hear in the gym. However, as this article will show you, it is also illogical and will usually not help the lifter in question. Missing a lift at lockout, particularly while bench pressing, is an occurrence that seems common, but in actuality, it isn't.

When a lifter says they miss a lift at lockout, they usually think that they are closer to the end of the lift than they really are. Instead, the lift usually fails about halfway up, just before lockout. The problem, then, is not the muscles responsible for locking out the lift; rather, it is a lack of speed coming out of the bottom of the lift, whether it be off the chest for a bench press, out of the hole during the squat, or off of the floor for the deadlift.

To illustrate this logic, think about your rack pull or your two-board press. These movements, despite starting right at your sticking point, are often stronger than your full range-of-motion lifts. So, if you can rack pull 550, with a deadlift max of 475, why would improving your rack pull improve your deadlift? Those muscles are already strong enough to move that extra weight. The problem is not strength. It is all about speed from the bottom of the lift.

So, how does a lifter go about strengthening the bottom portion of the lift? Simple: always train the bottom of the lift. Partial ROM movements do not accomplish this. When you are constantly fighting the weight at the bottom of the lift, you will acclimate to that stimulus, and become stronger at that point. When the weight flies off your chest on a bench press, it doesn't matter how bad you are at lockout; the sheer momentum of the weight will allow you to blow right through your sticking point and finish the lift successfully.

In my training, I train the bottom of the lift in multiple ways. For my bench press movements, I always pause on my chest, for every rep, no matter the weight. This also provides the added benefit of preparing for the pause that is required for the bench press in a powerlifting meet. I also add in pause squats in my training; for this, I simply use my normal squat technique, but with a 2-3 second pause in the hole.

A similar training effect can be had from a box squat, but it is important to keep the box below parallel, and to box squat properly; bouncing off the box is an obvious no-no. Some coaches teach their lifters to relax their hamstrings while sitting on the box, however, for the raw lifter, keep the tension on your hamstrings, as this is what will happen as you squat in competition. Relaxing the hamstrings is, in general, for equipped lifters only.

The deadlift is a little bit different, as the weight is already motionless when you begin the lift. The only time there is a significant stretch reflex for the deadlift is when doing sets of multiple repetitions. For the deadlift, I simply suggest that you rest the bar completely on the ground in between reps; don't do a simple tap-and-go. A great movement to add in to your training is the deficit deadlift. I like to stand on a bumper plate or two while doing these; you can use plates, a small box, or whatever you have that is sturdy enough to hold you while holding hundreds of pounds in your hands. A deficit of 2-4" is enough; too high of a deficit, and you will begin to resemble a cat doing its dirty business as you lift the weight. Keep the deficit reasonable enough to at least have a chance of maintaining your arch.

Another method to generate speed, which I will only touch on, is the dynamic effort method. I won't go into much detail on this method because 1. there are about 50 billion articles on the dynamic effort method floating around the internet 2. in order to really go in depth about this method, you would need to do a hell of a lot more than read one article on it. Essentially, the dynamic effort method revolves around lift sub-maximal weight (usually around 50-70% of the lifters 1RM), focusing on moving the weight as fast as the lifter can, usually for several sets and a low number of reps per set. This is a very important part of the conjugate system method. However, it can also be utilized, in a sense, by simply focusing on bar speed during your warm-up sets. Bands and chains are also commonly used tools for this method; again, that is a subject for a completely different series of articles.

As a raw lifter who has missed many a bench press at the halfway point of the lift, I can speak from experience that training the bottom of the lift, using full, paused ROM movements and special exercises such as deficit deadlifts, is the best way to move past sticking points and become stronger at lockout. Generate speed, and the strength will come.

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:04 pm

Finally got those up

We are now working with adbrite for our ads
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:10 pm

Not sure where else to ask this, but what's the plan for the "Calculators" tab? Are we going to provide links to let people download excel program spreadsheets? I have a ton of spreadsheets that we can use, if that's the route we want to take Or is it possible to do some Javascript or something so people can use the calculator(s) right on the site?. We could also provide links to other websites if that's possible.

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:13 pm

Chris Anderson wrote:
Not sure where else to ask this, but what's the plan for the "Calculators" tab? Are we going to provide links to let people download excel program spreadsheets? I have a ton of spreadsheets that we can use, if that's the route we want to take Or is it possible to do some Javascript or something so people can use the calculator(s) right on the site?. We could also provide links to other websites if that's possible.

I would like to have it coded into the website if possible. We want people to come back consistently rather than DL a spreadsheet and leave.

I need to mess around with it more and see if I can get it done
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:05 pm

I feel like Keough is calling Chris and I out for doing our 100 rep challenges.

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:31 pm

Seeing as he participated in one, that would make him a hypocrite. I say we kick him out of the club for such an act. As new president, I will force Monty to provide donuts for all meetings and training sessions, or be sentenced to 2 hours of of speed deadlifts a day.

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PostSubject: Q&A With Vashon Perryman, #1-Ranked 165-lb. Powerlifter   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:10 pm

Vashon Perryman is the current #1-ranked 165-lb. powerlifter in the United States. Over the past two years, he has quickly established himself as the premier squatter in his weight class, with a 584-lb. squat. Vashon is also a world-class deadlifter, having deadlifted 661 lbs. in competition. His current 1526-lb. total ranks him #1 in the country at his weight class.

1. Could you describe your approach to training?

When I train for a powerlifting competition I like to dedicate two days a week for power and have two days of speed. Other than that, I focus a lot on developing my core doing five different exercises throughout the week. I found this to be a good method to gaining strength and power.

2. You also compete regularly as a lightweight bodybuilder, don't you? Could you talk about the challenges and rewards for competing both as a bodybuilder and a powerlifter?

I never want to lose any strength, so I was faced with the task of developing a program that promoted power and muscle hypertrophy. After a few trial weeks, I had a program that I was happy with. Six weeks later I won Mr. Kansas drug free bodybuilding and seven weeks later I had a pretty good performance benching 319 lbs., squatting 585 lbs. and deadlifting 645 lbs. So I was rewarded with a program design that gave me the strength I needed and the look I wanted.

3. What have you learned from bodybuilding that has has a positive affect on your powerlifting, and vice-versa?

The best thing I learned was how much nutrition really does play a key role in training. I had never really paid attention to my diet until I was training for a powerlifting and bodybuilding competition at the same time. I maintained a high level of energy throughout the week which helped me to become stronger for a longer period of time. I really think this has helped my max deadlift because I'm not as tired as I use to be by the time deadlift was up.

4. What type of conditioning do you incorporate into your training?

By conditioning could be anything from running hills, sprint drills or crossfit training. I will only do one to two days a week for 30 minutes or less.

5. How many times per week do you squat? Do you do any squat variations (e.g. high bar, front squat)?

No matter the muscle group, I spend two days a week on it. My squat doesn't really vary, but the exercises will change depending on how close I am to the competition.

6. How often do you deadlift, and at what intensities? What is the highest reps/set that you regularly train for DL in support of PL (not BB)? If you were to guess the average # of reps per week that you train DL what would it be?

I will deadlift once a week. I don't really train heavy on deadlift. I am more interested in form when I approach that lift. sets of six reps will be my highest. Thirty reps per week, including my warm up.

7. You were barefoot in the deadlift portion, right? Those weren't slippers or anything, right? Is that how you train normally?

I did have slippers on but I train deadlift barefoot most of the time.

8. If you could change one thing about powerlifting, what would it be?

I would only have one federation where we all could compete together.

9. Thoughts on federation politics?

My thoughts have been back and forth. May the best man win!

10. What does your diet look like?

I try to maintain a well balanced diet, consuming the bulk of my carbs in the morning and having veggies with every meal.

11. What supplements do you regularly use?

There's not a particular brand, but I like to have a caffeine and creatine pre-workout and high amount of simple carbs immediately after my workout with whey protein.

12. Are there any powerlifters that you look up to?

I can't really say that there's anyone that I would say that I look up to. The main reason for this is that when I started powerlifting, It was because I loved the way it forced me to give everything I had to each workout to become better. I never really knew who that best powerlifters in the world were until about two years ago. But since then, I have seen so many great lifters that I can't pin point any single person.

13. How does your training differ when you prepare for a meet, if at all? (i.e. Do you do in-season and out-season training).

Whenever there's not an upcoming competition, I periodize my programs. Depending on the length, I rotate between endurance, strength and hypertrophy programs.

14. What are your basic opinions on the sport of powerlifting and lifters (the way comps are run, atmosphere at a meet, etc.)?

When I first started this sport, I approached it with the attitude that everyone's an enemy. I never tried to talk to anyone, it was all business. Now, I have found that everyone wants to see everyone succeed. I usually don't have many people I know watch me in person at a competition so it's great to hear more people in the audience cheering me on than just my mom!

15. Do you see yourself going up a weight class in the near future?

I can see myself competing in the 181-lb. class in the next few years.

16. How do you feel has bodybuilding training and bodybuilding comp preparation affected your progress as a powerlifter, if at all?

I haven't seen any negative effects in my progress between the two disciplines. I don't really have trouble maintaining strength or staying lean.

17. what kind of dynamic work do you do, if any?

I don't do anything in particular besides doing all my exercises with a high level of speed. I don't want to just lift the weight, I want it to go up fast and aggressive.

18. what do you think of crossfit and have you considered competing in it?

Crossfit is fun for off season training, but it's really not anything I can see myself really competing in.

19. whats a typical workout like?

A typical workout would be two to three compound exercises, followed by two to four single joint exercises. Reps change depending on what my goals for the month are.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:20 pm

he sounds like a weak ecto fgt

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PostSubject: Q&A With Justin Randal Following His 1951-lb. Elite Raw Total   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:20 pm

Justin Randal recently posted a 1951-lb. raw powerlifting total in the 275-lb. weight class; that total cemented Justin as one of the top raw 275-lb. powerlifters in the entire country. This came after Justin had already established himself as an elite-level equipped lifter. Now, Justin is looking ahead at crossing the 2000-lb. barrier at his next meet.

1. First of all, just so that everyone knows, could you give us your best competition lifts? Do you have any goals for the near future that you hope to reach soon?

In my last meet I went 733, 512, 705 (PR’s except for the pull), finishing with a 1951 Raw total. The next step is to total 2000+ at the WCO on Dec 1.

2. What's your training philosophy like? I know that you've used Westside and 5/3/1 in the past--are their valuable parts of these methodologies that you're incorporating in your training now?

I mostly run conjugate as it keeps you from peaking in any particular movement. My #1 training method is to do the things I like the least as this is where I am typically weakest.

3. What's your take on Westside for raw lifters? Some swear by it, while others say it's really only effective for geared lifting.

Westside is the greatest program on the planet! For raw lifting I typically just take out most of the box squatting and do a bit less board work in the press (Though a bit of both are still necessary).

4. Also, what's your take on Westside for newcomers? Another question I have here is your take on dynamic-effort training for newcomers: would you advise only lifters of a certain experience level to do dynamic-effort training, or do you think it can be useful even for novices?

I would actually recommend more dynamic work than ME work for the newcomers. It is more important to teach speed and form in the beginning rather than loading them up from the get go. It’s like that typical high school football coach that decides to teach his kids to squat and also wants to find out who is the strongest squatter on the first day. I get that he wants to know where they are at but he is doing it to the detriment of their progress and more importantly their health. Starting with max effort work is counter-effective to the progress and health of a potential strength athlete without first building proper form and motor recruitment patterns.

5. You're a very explosive lifter who prides himself on being explosive. I've always felt like explosive lifters, because they spend less time under tension with near-maximal weights, benefit from being able to do more work than lifters who are less explosive. Do you think this is the case? Has being so fast helped you train more?

I think that it helps immensely at the meet but can slow my progress a bit as I tend to spend less time under tension in training. For this purpose, I have intentionally slowed some of my ME days and like to add bands or chains thus causing me to strain maximally for a longer period of time and throughout more of the lift.

6. If you can narrow it down, is there one thing that you've changed about your training in the last year to turn yourself into a mid-700s deadlifter?

Not officially in the mids yet. I tend to pull a lot less weight less often. For some rare individuals training heavily often makes them stronger. For me, this is not the case.

7. What made you decide to concentrate on raw lifting? It seems like a lot of suited lifters are transitioning now--do you think there's a shift in focus towards raw lifting taking place in powerlifting?

To lift as the greats lifted!

I started my lifting career as a geared lifter and plan to be again. I think there are some great benefits to geared lifting and have nothing against it. Eventually I believe that I will go 1100, 900, 800 at 275 and will likely start that run in the next year or so.That being said-
We take pills to make us thinner, have drinks that keep us awake, medications that mask pain and now gear that makes us feel stronger. Are we actually stronger? On one side I would say yes, gear allows us to overload our systems and lift unimaginable amounts of weight. What I don’t agree with is hiding behind the gear. There are some amazingly talented lifters out there that may never grace the platform as raw lifters. This is a travesty as far as I’m concerned.

8. You've trained with a ton of really strong people. Who impresses you the most? Who have you learned the most from?

Man that’s a tough question!

As far as being impressed- Chris Duffin pulling 900 (Straps or not) was by far the craziest thing I’ve ever seen!!

As far as learning is concerned I’ll break that down by lift as I feel they are equally important.

Squat- Ben Seath taught me how tosSquat big and never to fear the weight. Our first hurdle is in our heads!

Bench- Dan Atchison and his crew in Lynnwood took me in early in my lifting career and showed me the ropes. Form, rep schemes, WESTSIDE!! Huge thanks to Dan!!

Deads- I easily learned the Most from Ricky Lahourcade (755 raw puller) and Todd Christianson, who trained with Doyle Kennedy back when he was the first person to pull 900! They both continue to hammer me on form and pull the reigns when I get a little carried away and chase too much weight.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:21 pm

Chris Anderson wrote:
he sounds like a weak ecto fgt

So hateful.

I'm working on doing one of these with Joe Morrow. If there are other lifters you think would make for interesting interviews, let me know, and I'll try to contact them.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:25 pm

I wanna do an interview with Scott Herman so I can let him know how much I fucking hate him.

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Wed Oct 31, 2012 7:25 pm

Vashon Perryman: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hht2Qk73zTA
Justin Randal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=hLX9K8mgfbU

In case you want to post video with these.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Wed Oct 31, 2012 10:11 pm

Make a plan, Stan, and you'll be the man: the necessity of making, keeping, and recording a goal-oriented plan



Ed Coan, widely regarded as the best powerlifter of all time, when asked in a video interview by Jim McDonald of SuperTraining.tv what the best piece of advice he ever received was, said "make up a very well thought-out plan at the beginning, and stick to it." I cannot agree more, and I will use some of my personal experiences to show why making a good plan is one of the most important concepts for any lifter, from a beginner to a world-record holder, to grasp.

Last weekend, on October 27th, 2012, I recorded the best performance I have ever had in a powerlifting meet: I went ten-for-ten, breaking all of my personal records, including three NASA American records (which I already owned). Included in this performance was an 82lb total PR, and my first competition bench press PR in about a year and a half. I can confidently say that I did so well because I was able to make a training plan immediately after the previous meet, and I stuck religiously to the plan, only making minor changes as my lifts progressed and my needs changed.

My programming was nothing fancy; a simple linear periodization peaking cycle was all I used, which was a mainstay of Ed Coan's training back in the 90's. For my assistance work, I would hit a variation of the opposite lift (in other words, on my bench press day, I would do an overhead press variation, and on an overhead press day, I would do a bench press variation. These were done directly after my main work sets), usually doing moderately heavy singles, doubles, or triples, or occasionally going for a small PR in that lift if I felt really good. My accessory work was very light, usually sets of ten, on general movements such as face pulls and glute-ham raises. Occasionally I would "fill in the gaps" with some bicep or ab work, or even work a small muscle group such as my neck or forearms.

The specific peaking cycle I used allowed me to work up to two main work sets; at first, these were sets of ten or eight, and then sets of five, three, and finally two, with increasing intensity. I could warm up however I wanted to, but my work sets were set in stone. As a result, I knew exactly what I was doing that day, and I missed a grand total of two reps in my work sets over my entire training cycle. By making failure in my training a very rare occurrence, I conditioned my body to expect to finish the lift.

Most of my planning, however, was dedicated towards the meet day itself. At about three weeks out of the meet, I took out a notepad and wrote down what I thought would be challenging, yet makeable attempts; these attempts were always oriented towards breaking PR's and hitting the exact numbers I wanted. As the meet grew closer and closer, I was able to adjust my attempts until I had them exactly where I wanted. During the meet, I followed these attempts exactly, with the only exception being the fourth squat attempt to break a PR.

My other meet planning revolved around my warmups; in my previous meets, I would warm up very early, leaving me sitting and getting cold for my first attempt. This defeats the purpose of the warm up sets, so I waited to begin warming up this time around, making me warm up quicker. This kept me mentally focused, and it also helped recreate a typical training session for me, as I tend to warm up quicker. This is an example of using previous experiences to adjust my planning; every good lifter must do this. A plan does no good for a lifter if it is not tailored specifically to their strengths and weaknesses.

There are some lifters who are able to get away with very little planning; one such example would be Jamie Lewis, world-record holding 181lb powerlifter, whose programming involves doing essentially whatever he feels like on a given day, and hammering the crap out of that lift until he feels like he's done enough work. These people are few and far between, however, and it is best to let them use their approach. A lesson can be learned from these such lifters, though: they have found that this approach works for them simply through trial and error, which reinforces the concept that a plan must be specific to an athlete in order to work best; I challenge anybody who is willing to do the research to find an elite athlete who has attained his success through nothing but cookie-cutter programs, without altering a single aspect of that program.

To put it simply, when making your program, make sure it is adjusted to your training and competition experiences. Stick to the plan, and evaluate your performance after you have made it completely through that training cycle. Plan, train, compete, analyze: this formula has worked for athletes everywhere, and it isn't about to stop working now.

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Keosawa
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 7:46 pm

Kevin, could you post our new content when you get the chance? If you can upload Chris's article and my interviews, I will get us more content.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 8:01 pm

KKeough wrote:
Kevin, could you post our new content when you get the chance? If you can upload Chris's article and my interviews, I will get us more content.

Yes I will do it over break.

Checklist
[ ] Update Homepage
[ ] Add Vids
[ ] Add Articles
[ ] Add Tab for meet results?

I was considering adding a picture to everyone's bio, but I didn't want to post up peoples pics without their permission. These will come up on a google search engine

Also idk how to do it. But maybe a slideshow?

Anything else?
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 8:19 pm

KevinAlvy wrote:
KKeough wrote:
Kevin, could you post our new content when you get the chance? If you can upload Chris's article and my interviews, I will get us more content.

Yes I will do it over break.

Checklist
[ ] Update Homepage
[ ] Add Vids
[ ] Add Articles
[ ] Add Tab for meet results?

I was considering adding a picture to everyone's bio, but I didn't want to post up peoples pics without their permission. These will come up on a google search engine

Also idk how to do it. But maybe a slideshow?

Anything else?

I will try to get a few of our new, more active lifters to post bios. But so far, that list looks great to me.
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:05 pm

KevinAlvy wrote:
KKeough wrote:
Kevin, could you post our new content when you get the chance? If you can upload Chris's article and my interviews, I will get us more content.

Yes I will do it over break.

Checklist
[ ] Update Homepage
[ ] Add Vids
[ ] Add Articles
[ ] Add Tab for meet results?

I was considering adding a picture to everyone's bio, but I didn't want to post up peoples pics without their permission. These will come up on a google search engine

Also idk how to do it. But maybe a slideshow?

Anything else?
PMing you some pics, the standard double biceps front and back, rear glute spread, etc.

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 10:39 pm

A few things:

Update the bio's with everybody's meet performances.
Remove Michael's bio "slot" for the love of god.
And throw in a gigantic pic of Franco's face on the homepage, just to intimidate viewers.

I like the meet results tab page; that can be where the meet videos go. I think that our training videos (our highlights videos that we will be doing, and maybe some of our other training videos, possibly) need a spot somewhere.

I for one give you permission to use any pic from the meet for my bio if you want. Maybe you can find a way to incorporate our team photo as well?

It's a lot, but I think the page will be pretty awesome after it's done.





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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:28 pm

Nathan Poage wrote:

PMing you some pics, the standard double biceps front and back, rear glute spread, etc.

brb reinstalling picviewer4000.exe since no pics

Chris Anderson wrote:
A few things:

Update the bio's with everybody's meet performances.
Remove Michael's bio "slot" for the love of god.
And throw in a gigantic pic of Franco's face on the homepage, just to intimidate viewers.

I like the meet results tab page; that can be where the meet videos go. I think that our training videos (our highlights videos that we will be doing, and maybe some of our other training videos, possibly) need a spot somewhere.

I for one give you permission to use any pic from the meet for my bio if you want. Maybe you can find a way to incorporate our team photo as well?

It's a lot, but I think the page will be pretty awesome after it's done.

Sounds good, I should get it done


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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:37 pm

Thanks again for handling this, Kevin. When I take over the sport of powerlifting and decide between who lives and who competes until the end of time in SPF, I will look upon you and say, "no--spare this one."
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:02 am

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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:05 am

KKeough wrote:
Thanks again for handling this, Kevin. When I take over the sport of powerlifting and decide between who lives and who competes until the end of time in SPF, I will look upon you and say, "no--spare this one."

lol'd


It's too bad we don't have pledges to do the dirty work around here...
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PostSubject: Re: Training Article Submissions   Fri Nov 16, 2012 1:07 am

It's okay, George. You and I can join the CFAPLA: Chick-Fil-A Powerlifting Association. I've already tried pulling off a coup earlier, I think Kyle is on to me now. We best hide in the shadows for a while.

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