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 The Come Up

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babyeater
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 12:01 pm

I'll just put it out there that this has never remotely been something that has happened with a new member before. Ever. I feel really bad about it, and I'm just happy when anyone decides to join up because it usually means they're willing to learn and better their lifting. A lot of guys in the CRWC think their lifting is stellar such that they are above doing either.

NO ONE in that gym or this club is at a point at which they are doing everything near-perfectly/are at an advanced lifter level. NO ONE.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 12:13 pm

Honestly, this is not how I choose to treat other people. BUT, as of Sunday, I'm no longer the President. We will have new officers, and it will be up to them to determine the future direction of the club. This powerlifting club can be whatever those officers decide it should be--I've tried to make this a newbie-friendly environment to bring in a lot of lifters, but I would understand if someone wants to make it more about attracting serious-minded powerlifters. A bigger club isn't necessarily a better one: that has just been a goal of mine since we started (to introduce new people to the sport). But ultimately, it's up to new leadership what direction this club goes in. I'm not always going to be here, and this club needs to be able to sustain itself without me, which means that the club needs to decide who they want as members, who they don't want as members, and how they want to portray their club to the rest of the university.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 3:23 pm

Will Diebolt wrote:

Gonna keep logging here for now. The actions of one individual are incomprehensible to me and I still haven't heard back from him.
You said you were going to contact me through Facebook, or try to see if the chat worked on the mobile site. I'm trying to let things simmer down, please do not try to make it look like I'm trying to make things worse.

Also, speaking of Facebook: I can't find you on there anyway, so if you're expecting me to reach out to you, you will have to change your privacy settings. The only contact I have had from you is a friend request sent before we talked whatsoever. I went to respond to it, and it had disappeared. I don't know if you rescinded the request or what.

I'm open to more communication, as I believe my responses to you during our chat indicated.

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 3:51 pm

KKeough wrote:
I haven't even met you, so I don't really know much of anything about this situation.
I am not sure what the situation is either and I have no idea why Chris would say that my actions have made me unpopular. Perhaps other club members are upset over my unveiling and a consensus was established? Otherwise, I would guess that Chris is speaking for the rest of you. Or something else I have written about in this log is particular offensive? But he said that it was my actions at the gym. Maybe it's my choice of exercise selection? Use of the water fountain?

I'm not sure what to take away from your other post, Kyle. You mention that the new administration can decide whether to make this an exclusive club for serious powerlifters. if that means achieving a definite total or Wilks score in order to join the club I can tell you that the organization is bound for demise, particularly if you are already having trouble recruiting members, and not just for the simple exclusion of some weak members. Perhaps you were alluding to something more general. I'm not sure what the relevance is in this case, although I can see that this is your general perspective as the exiting president.

And sure, I get the reasoning behind the shirt rules in most gyms but I think I did my due diligence and ostensibly there is no such rule at this gym. The irony is that I am a very modest person and I hardly ever go around without my shirt on. I did not do it to parade around and I don't go to the gym to for other people. I try not to look at anyone. I did it because I was incredibly hot. My back came into contact with the barbell just like a girl in a sports bra or a dude in a tank top. So there is little to no difference.

This misses the point though. Chris posted in my log that if I ever did this again or made reference to training shirtless that I would be banned. When I stood up for myself (no matter that I believed him to be joking) he pulled the "I squat more than you" card. Then he deleted everything except for a final message -- having the last word, if you will -- only reaffirming that I was a biological hazard with behavior issues, and that he is the boss. This is all so wrong on so many levels. I don't even know what else to say.

I feel like I'm in the nuthouse. bounce 

I wanted to join this for club to learn because I saw a few very impressive videos on the FB page but I hope that the learning goes both ways. I hope this isn't the sort of place where someone takes the opinion: "I am stronger than this person. They have nothing to teach me." We all have functional and structural characteristics that suit us one way or another. A short, robustly built man with severe pennation angles is going to be naturally very well suited to lifting a barbell with maximal load. These inherent qualities are a disadvantage when the speed of movement is very fast, or when a certain distance must be covered in a short amount of time. Even among strength sports you can see that this is true: consider that strongman are oftentimes taller than powerlifters. Someone with shorter arms will be a better bench presser and a worse deadlifter. Does that mean this individual has no valuable knowledge or experience deadlifting? Does it guarantee they know much about bench pressing? No, obviously not.

I am not an extremely dislikable person under most circumstances, especially if you get to know me a little. This whole thing has created unnecessary discomfort for a few people involved. I don't think that I am to blame at all. I have not made any insults to anyone and I have no reason to do this. I will show up at the meeting tomorrow. To do otherwise would be poor form. It's pretty weird that I haven't even met any of you really. Maybe I will decide that this is not the place for me. Maybe I'll get voted off the island anyway. I haven't even made up my mind that Chris is a bad dude. This is the fucking internet.

babyeater wrote:
As far as mental prep for difficult sets or a max or, hell, competition goes: I kind of go into a focused/meditative state. For me, there is no "anger/charged up/amped up/kill bitches" mentality. I don't need it, and it doesn't help me. I clear my mind, focus internally, and trust my body to do what it needs to complete the lift because I have trained it over thousands of reps for that job. But some people get angry. There is no right or wrong way, but the one I describe is how I approach it.
This is very similar to my approach.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 3:52 pm

Chris Anderson wrote:
Will Diebolt wrote:

Gonna keep logging here for now. The actions of one individual are incomprehensible to me and I still haven't heard back from him.
You said you were going to contact me through Facebook, or try to see if the chat worked on the mobile site. I'm trying to let things simmer down, please do not try to make it look like I'm trying to make things worse.

Also, speaking of Facebook: I can't find you on there anyway, so if you're expecting me to reach out to you, you will have to change your privacy settings. The only contact I have had from you is a friend request sent before we talked whatsoever. I went to respond to it, and it had disappeared. I don't know if you rescinded the request or what.

I'm open to more communication, as I believe my responses to you during our chat indicated.
I sent you a message when I got off chat. I hit the wrong button when I was trying to figure out the stupid mobile website. I didn't rescind the request because I changed my mind about you.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:00 pm

A Facebook message?

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:02 pm

Yes. It said it would go in a certain folder because we aren't connected or something like that. Maybe it's hidden?
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:05 pm

I will also say that you are still welcome to come to the meeting, as well as log here. However, I am going to ask that you do not try to bring any of this situation to the meeting, as it will only serve as a distraction for the other members. I will be doing the same, as I want to focus on the meeting.

If you wish to speak to me, Kyle, or anybody else about it, please do so either before or after the meeting, on the forum chat, or on Facebook. I don't want to clutter up your thread anymore, and I'm sure you feel the same.


EDIT: Ah, I actually just found the message. I will try to get back to you on that later tonight.

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:16 pm

Chris Anderson wrote:
I am going to ask that you do not try to bring any of this situation to the meeting
Of course not. We can debate the merits of going shirtless in PMs here on through FB (although I've been spending more time here lately)
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 8:17 pm

Will Diebolt wrote:


I'm not sure what to take away from your other post, Kyle. You mention that the new administration can decide whether to make this an exclusive club for serious powerlifters. if that means achieving a definite total or Wilks score in order to join the club I can tell you that the organization is bound for demise, particularly if you are already having trouble recruiting members, and not just for the simple exclusion of some weak members. Perhaps you were alluding to something more general. I'm not sure what the relevance is in this case, although I can see that this is your general perspective as the exiting president.
The future direction of this club is not my decision. I am gone from Iowa City after this year, and I made the decision to step down as President this year so that other members could gain experience in a leadership position.

Put simply, the club members decide the direction of the club. It's not really my choice any longer. If they want to get rid of everyone who does step-ups--and that's how the voting goes--then that's the direction the club goes in. I am not going to influence that decision.

The relevance is that it's going to be up to the future officers how they attract incoming members, how they present themselves as a club, and what standards they set for membership. The current members NEED to nominate--and elect--officers in whom they believe. I strongly urge people to nominate members they think will do the best job. This was necessary for our first two years, and it remains necessary today.

If you want to know why I am not being candid on the issue, it's because I'm not going to endorse--or publicly denounce--anyone on the eve of tomorrow's election. I don't think that would be right of me to do so; instead, I'll just place my vote just like everyone else.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:25 pm

Sorry I don't mean to butt in, it seems like this got blown way out of proportion. I think by serious powerlifters it was meant people who are interested in the sport of powerlifting specifically, not a certain wilks score or total. Seriousness can't really be measured in a number. Right now we're pretty open to anyone interested in strength training, regardless of level, experience, or amount of knowledge. I'm hoping it stays that way as we have had great success introducing people to the sport and helping them along in their journey of strength training, myself included. In all reality were all pretty friendly people and very approachable. I'd advise anyone joining the club or posting on here to take almost anything they hear/read with a grain of salt and good humor.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:57 pm

I will tell you now that there is not a single member in the club that wants to, or has ever wanted to, require members to have any sort of qualifying total, Wilks, or "credentials" of any sort. The club exists as an avenue for lifters to begin their activity in the sport of powerlifting, and for current powerlifters to have a way to be around each other and grow as strength athletes.

I'm not sure how this became an issue, but it's going to stop now. There is never going to be any sort of requirement to be a member of University of Iowa Powerlifting other than to abide by the rules set by the University of Iowa.



Will, I just got home and I am available to talk on Facebook if you would like.

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 12:50 am

Two things I want to make a point of:

(1) I am seriously interested in the sport and I will definitely compete at some point although (a) I don't practice all three lifts right now, (b) I am weak, and (c) I suspect my training style might make some people roll their eyes if they are accustomed to a powerlifting style of training. Philosophically I don't believe that powerlifting is the end-all-be-all to strength training, although I understand that this is a viewpoint that some people firmly hold. I am honestly quite suspicious that some exercises are very valuable but there is only one way to really find out.

(2) If I am welcome to vote in the elections I will abstain. I have no good basis to judge the merits of the candidates and I don't want anyone thinking that what has happened here has influenced my decision to vote a certain way.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 12:58 am

Will Diebolt wrote:
interested in the sport
This is essentially the only requirement to be a member. More people need to know this, actually. I'm making it a point to bring that up at the meeting.

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 1:38 am

Will Diebolt wrote:
Philosophically I don't believe that powerlifting is the end-all-be-all to strength training, although I understand that this is a viewpoint that some people firmly hold.

Powerlifting falls under the umbrella of “strength sports”. This category also includes, but is not limited to strongman, weightlifting, and highland games.

I think it is safe to say that powerlifting is the best strength sport at measuring absolute strength, but I agree with you that this doesn’t necessary entail that it is the best way to measure strength in a more general sense. It comes down to how you define strength. For some it is being able to pick up things, drag, and carry. Some it is how much you can throw or how far you can jump. For others it is just simply how much can you lift.

If you look at the history of powerlifting you will find that it is rather arbitrary how we arrived at the squat, bench, and deadlift. You will also find that these lifts have not always been the “powerlifting” lifts. They did some weird ass shit back in the day to measure strength.

I think you’ll find that there can be a fairly large range of training styles for strength training, and even for powerlifting. You seem to be interested in a lot of plyometric work, which is something that several top-level powerlifters have emphasized recently as being necessary to developing the explosiveness needed to move large weights.

I think you would love Chad Wesley Smith. He is a strength athlete first, and a powerlifter second. He’s a national champion in the shotput, an American record holder in the squat, and has his pro card in strongman.

I’ll leave this here
http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/TeamJTS/chad-smith/

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:00 am

Appreciate you posting that.

Allprocro wrote:
If you look at the history of powerlifting you will find that it is rather arbitrary how we arrived at the squat, bench, and deadlift. You will also find that these lifts have not always been the “powerlifting” lifts. They did some weird ass shit back in the day to measure strength.
Good points. I've sometimes wondered why 2 of the 3 lifts are performed from a dead-stop/pause with no stretch reflex but squats are performed with an eccentric lowering and a stretch reflex out of the hole. It does seem arbitrary to me also and doing them from pins would get rid of any question about depth that seems to drive so many people crazy in this sport. The disadvantage is having to change the effective pin height between lifters in a meet but as I understand it this is already done in the bench press in some feds were there are spotter arms attached to the bench. I think I prefer to watch/do them from a descent first anyway. The bounce out of the bottom is a lot of fun.

Allprocro wrote:
You seem to be interested in a lot of plyometric work, which is something that several top-level powerlifters have emphasized recently as being necessary to developing the explosiveness needed to move large weights.
Actually I've never done any true plyometrics. There seems to be a lot of confusion over it and I think the term should be avoided at all costs. "Pliometric" muscle action is a Russian term that translates into "eccentric" muscle action -- lengthening of the muscle while it contracts. I believe American T&F coach Fred Wilt is responsible for coining the term in English. He observed the jumping exercises that the Soviets invented half a century ago and brought his findings back to America. The distinction is that these are not any ordinary type of jumping, and DEFINITELY not the type of sub-maximal jumping onto a box for 20+ reps that commonly defines the term today in America (thanks in no small part to the Crossfit movement).

The key understanding must be that these exercises need to be extremely intense and reflexive. Soviet coaches sought to increase the intensity of the training for elite athletes. In seeking this goal, Yuri Verkhoshansky says that he first experimented with partial squats for overload. He reports that this resulted in injury to the lower back of his athletes and I think he would have agreed that the exercise is not specific enough to the task of jumping. (Although many coaches do use partial squats, particularly celebrated throwing coach, former WR holder, Olympic champion, PhD, and decorated patriot, Anatoly Bondarchuk. Verkoshansky speculated late in life that that the morphological differences between heavier throwers and the comparatively frail bodies of jumpers may play a part in their difference of opinion on this topic. The partial/full squat debate is for another time, however.) The "shock method" or "hit method" was born out of his subsequent search for intensified training means. An athlete drops from a height (say 1 meter) and gains kinetic energy during the free fall. The athletes mentally prepares to attack the ground before impact and jumps as high as possible. This exercise is commonly called a "depth jump". Preparation for this exercise can be done in the form of a "depth drop" where the landing is simply stuck to develop the eccentric component. These are supposed to be very intense exercises to the nervous system, skeleton, ligaments, and tendons (which undergo a larger amplitude of movement than the muscles -- not to say that the muscles are not trained, and in fact this type of exercise selectively fatigues fast twitch muscles. Hypertrophy of slow twitch muscles has been thought to decrease the speed of contraction due to a friction like effect). The utilization of these exercises is rather limited in the scope of a training cycle, and NOT suited to a beginner or intermediate athlete. At least that is the tradition so far as I understand it. The involuntary, reflexive nature of the exercise is what allows so much more force to be produced in such a sort period of time. Dr. Yessis does a good job at explaining this exercise in English.

Although Wilt is responsible for the misnomer, it is easy for me to see why he did this. When the speed of movement is very slow in a maximal attempt the strength involved depends both on the isometric starting strength at the beginning of the movement, and dynamical strength once force has been applied and the joints are in motion. In contrast, when the speed of movement is very fast during a maximal attempt, isometric starting strength dictates the resulting movement. This is easy to see: when a barbell is light the bounce out of the hole is sufficient to carry you all the way back to standing. When the barbell gets heavier this is not the case. (I have recently wondered if these are not distinct qualities that need to be trained separately particularly when a lifter is fast out of the hole and cannot produce force when the barbell is out of the hole, this being part of the reason for some very nasty sticking points in otherwise very quick lifts. Maybe the use of chains/bands is useful for this reason.) My point is that the force produced in a jump is accentuated at isometric joint angles immediately after contact is made. Large forces must be generated at the turn around point. Although this is actually isometric, Verkhoshansky says that isometrics and quasi-isometrics are very similar. It is the anticipation of attacking the ground during the eccentric phase that is the key to this exercise. I think this is what Wilt was getting at.

Allprocro wrote:
I think you would love Chad Wesley Smith. He is a strength athlete first, and a powerlifter second. He’s a national champion in the shotput, an American record holder in the squat, and has his pro card in strongman.

I’ll leave this here
http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/TeamJTS/chad-smith/
I have come across him just a little before and I thought maybe he had familiarity with Verkoshansky's work but I didn't realize he was so accomplished. Thanks again for this. I'll check out more.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:09 am

I am going to abandon the shallow step-ups I was doing before because they don't seem to fit my needs right now. The height is too shallow and the load is too great. I still think they can be great for my 1 leg take offs (maybe with another plate stacked underneath) but that's not my goal right now. They don't hit my glutei.

This was supposed to be my rest day but I need to find unilateral squat work that hits my glutei better. Not too hard -- just increase the depth. I think BSS or RFESS are an okay exercise but I don't want to wrestle with a bunch of heavy DBs and I am a little adverse to doing them with a barbell for some reason. I also have this thing going on with my hip flexor and I don't know if the stretch on the support leg is good/bad and there's just some 'extra' aspects of getting into position with this exercise that I don't want to deal with.

What I did was superset step-ups on 2 blocks with an exercise I have only seen/read about from Soviet training material. I had some contact with a CSCS who interns with the Chicago Bulls and he's done an isometric stim version of the exercise in a power rack against pins. I think I've even seen a video with Cal Dietz where he does the isometric stim variant. Anyway, it's basically just a split squat with the barbell between your legs. I first saw this talked about on the Pendlay forums. They have just as much of a hardon for all that Soviet shit. Apparently it's an exercise Medvedyev likes in his book A Program of Multi-Year Training in Weightlifting for early the preparation years of athletes. I have A System of Multi-Year Training but I haven't gotten into it really. When I get into Oly lifting I'm going to devour all that shit. Anyway it's interesting to me because it's not very specific to the WL movements except for the split jerk but I don't know why he likes holding the bar in this position instead of on the back. I also saw this exercise in Verkhoshansky's SST Manual in an appendix under special strength exercises for javelin throwers. I really like how it feels. I don't like doing split stance/lunge stuff with a bar on my back I feel too unstable.

superset 135x2x10 and the step-ups were alternating leg so I only did 5 reps per leg per set. I like alternating step-ups because I get a chance to feel out one leg and compare it to the other during the set. I remember reading that there is a training effect on the non-working limb when doing unilateral work. I think that's not exactly the same thing as what I'm talking about but I definitely feel that it's not just BS. Feeling pretty good because these seemed to hit my glutei nicely. I can tell my legs are pretty tired. No soreness (hardly ever get very sore these days) but they are definitely operating below 90%. I have a light squat day in two days and I don't want to mess up my training.

Now that I have all my exercise selection figured out this shouldn't be so disorganized. Just using the unilateral squats as assistance, not goings to do the pyramid program with them.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:46 pm

I was thinking of our conversation and bring to you this: http://www.jimwendler.com/2012/09/the-great-rack-pull-myth/

He doesn't address the biomechanical differences of a knee-height rack pull versus a deadlift, but he makes some good points. I myself have pulled 675 from knee height back when my max deadlift was ~550; at that time, my lockout was my weakness. If the biomechanics of the rack pull were the same, then that really shouldn't be the case.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Tue Sep 24, 2013 2:27 pm

All I got out of that article was that he hasn't seen a lot of carryover but admits that this could be due to ineffective training.

What I want to know is if the hip and knee angles will always correspond in a rack pull and a deadlift. If you look at freeze frames would you be able to tell them apart? The difference is that at the start position of a rack pull muscle tension has to be developed quickly from resting whereas in a deadlift the muscle tension has already been developed since the floor and the bar probably has some speed already. If you can get rid of those differences maybe you can find a more specific exercise that emphasizes the weak part. Bands or chains would do this. Training between joint angles will mostly increase force production between those joint angles. Do you not believe in emphasizing the weak part of the movement to strengthen it? I realize that fighting through the sticking point itself is emphasis on this region but if this is not working very well maybe trying something else is a good idea. I'd like to know what you think.

Verkhoshansky Week 2 Day 1 (light day)

Squat
145x8
180x6
210x6
225x5
245x2x5

Hip Ext on 45 degree
65x10
85x3x10

Hip thrust on block with lengthy pause at the top
135x3x10

BW unilateral hip ext on 45 degree
10 reps each leg

Feeling a little groggy. I keep going back and forth with how well I think my rehab is going. IDK if I'll ever get the muscle contracting like the other one. Really sucks. I think I get a better contraction on the the hip thrusts if I put the bar a little closer to me, not shoving it down into the crease so much. I'm wondering if dorsiflexing my ankles won't improve the contraction. I'll put my toes on a box and change out of my WL shoes next time to try this.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Tue Sep 24, 2013 3:00 pm

a barbell between one's legs in order to perform unilateral work? I completely cannot picture how this works mechanically.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Tue Sep 24, 2013 3:18 pm

Well split stance stuff isn't really unilateral. I guess the only truly unilateral exercises are pistols, and maybe step-ups count but you use other leg in the beginning more than you think, especially when the weight gets heavy.



I don't have my knee this far over my toes. The bar path is up and back.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Tue Sep 24, 2013 3:50 pm

Will Diebolt wrote:


What I want to know is if the hip and knee angles will always correspond in a rack pull and a deadlift. If you look at freeze frames would you be able to tell them apart?
Yes, I think so. To give you an example, here's Steve Goggins doing a really heavy top-of-the-knee rack pull:



Obviously, this is an exaggerated example because he doesn't have to find a way to maneuver the bar around his knees (he's starting at the top of the knee here), but I figured an exaggerated example would show how different the leveraging can be with a rack pull. The general rule I abide by is this: the higher the rack pull, the more the biomechanics can change.

Will Diebolt wrote:
The difference is that at the start position of a rack pull muscle tension has to be developed quickly from resting whereas in a deadlift the muscle tension has already been developed since the floor and the bar probably has some speed already.
Right. Though if the mechanics were exactly the same, wouldn't I be rack-pulling less than my best deadlift if the limiting factor on my deadlift were the lockout? (in other words, without pre-existing muscle tension and rate of force development, wouldn't it be harder to lock out the same weight?)

Will Diebolt wrote:
Bands or chains would do this.
Possibly, but the distribution of force, at least with bands, is different from just using a loaded barbell. Bands hung from reverse--from the top of the cage--influence your bar-path by keeping you in the groove; bands from the bottom do the opposite. This, again, will have an influence (albeit a small one) on the bar-path, which will affect biomechanics. I found when pulling against bands that I could distribute the weight back on my heels just a bit more while maintaining balance.

Will Diebolt wrote:
Do you not believe in emphasizing the weak part of the movement to strengthen it?
I do, but I don't think there exists a fool-proof understanding of weakness-development in which a part of a movement is divorced from what comes before (and after) it. Generally speaking, the perspective that I keep with me now is this: when I try to fix a movement-based weakness, I first try to do it within the full-range-of-motion movement itself. This is less efficient, but it's also a more reliable approach.

So, if that's a deadlift lockout, I'll just do a lot of sub-max deadlifting off the floor. I'll work "down" to a limiting factor in order to address it. If a more efficient means can be found, then I'll definitely use it, but this is where I start now in addressing weaknesses. I'll do, say, deadlifts at 60% for sets of 10 off the floor, and when I do these, I keep rate of force development until at least knee height down so that the lockout is as hard as possible. To me, it feels more natural than doing a deadlift with a pause, and it still has the effect of emphasizing the weak point.

Anyway, those are my thoughts.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Tue Sep 24, 2013 9:37 pm

Advice: Stop overthinking things. SRS. Analyzing is all good and stuff, but by far the most important thing is to just go lift heavy objects.

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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:11 am

I forgot to log some assistance stuff:

alternating leg step-ups on 2 blocks (want to measure the height; try to bring mesuring tape next time; hopefully it's above 18")
135x10
155x10
175x10
195x6
175x10
155x10

hip ext on 45 deg.
65x10
85x3x10
65x10

hip thrusts w/ back on a block & lengthy pause (dorsiflexing my ankles seems to recruit my hams a lot more so nevermind)
145x3x10

Yesterday I couldn't help myself from doing some 10-20m accel starts, bounding, skipping in the field behind my apartment. Grass wet. Slick basketball shoes. Maybe did a little too much. I don't think it's a bad idea to do just a little every 1-2 weeks so I don't get completely unaccustomed to moving around -- not that I worked up to anything great before this -- feeling pretty slow. Life would be so different if I hadn't paralyzed the most important muscle in my leg. I sort of didn't do the upper-body sessions I was supposed to do this week. Hard to get motivated for anything else except recovering from this fucking injury. I can't be too bothered with this other stuff.

Today I did Week 2 Day 2 of Verkhoshansky's pyramid program

145x8
180x6
210x5
245x4
260x4
275x3x4
260x5
225x8

These felt way too slow. I shouldn't have to grind at all. Part of it I think is I'm feeling tentative in the hole (part of it is insufficient recovery which is a little scary at this early point, but fixable). I regret using WL shoes for this cycle because I think I get a better glutei maximi contraction with flat feet.

Hip thrusts w/ back on a block & long pause

135x10
185x10
235x10

I don't know what is a good amount of weight to use. Right before I started this log I worked up to 505 for a bunch of reps but I was feeling it in my hamstrings and not getting a full hyperextended lockout. I think being able to pause with the full lockout is important so I'll keep adding some weight and notice how it feels.

KKeough wrote:
To give you an example, here's Steve Goggins doing a really heavy top-of-the-knee rack pull:

Looks like he's reintroduced his knees which would not be possible if he started from the floor. Seems kind of weird that someone would deliberately do this.

KKeough wrote:
in other words, without pre-existing muscle tension and rate of force development, wouldn't it be harder to lock out the same weight?
Maybe yes and no. I think that might actually make it easier but I don't know enough to say. It seems like the nervous system likes to operate the muscles in bursts.

KKeough wrote:
I'll do, say, deadlifts at 60% for sets of 10 off the floor, and when I do these, I keep rate of force development until at least knee height down so that the lockout is as hard as possible. To me, it feels more natural than doing a deadlift with a pause, and it still has the effect of emphasizing the weak point.
It seems like this is also divorced from what came before it since you're changing the way you exert yourself between the floor and the barbell. I think I see what you're saying regarding reliability versus gambling on a less similar exercise.

KKeough wrote:
Anyway, those are my thoughts.
Definitely appreciate them.
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PostSubject: Re: The Come Up   Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:51 am

On Saturday I did like 20 one foot take-offs with one approach step from standing. I put on 5lbs of BF in the last week or two and this was the day after my heavy squat day. So I'm fat and tired. I dunked it a few times and the rest were just lay ups with my finger tips on the rim. This was a compulsive seance. I feel pretty good considering things. My muscles were not firing so well because of the previous day's squatting effects. When I'm tired I'll plant my take off leg and the quads won't extend my knee very well. I feel it as isometric tension at the distal end of the muscles near the knee. When this happened the other day I got the sense that my hips were coming through just fine.  Happy that it feels like the muscle is doing its job. If I got the sense that my hip extension (gluteus maximus) is messed up that's bad. When I walk I still feel a difference in tension on my back leg pushing off.  It’s maddening that this persists. Doing more step-ups on a medium height doesn't seem to tease out much of a difference in strength though. Haven't really done much yet. I'm getting a better feeling for the 'right' groove and I felt I'm improving the way I use my gluteus maximus. Before my injury split stance/unilateral stuff would hit my glutei really well and beginning the movement felt like it was all ass. I think I'm getting that back and I felt a difference at the end of the day. I guess some adaptations are realized much faster than others! Still waiting on this 100% full recovery to manifest itself. Won’t be awing anyone with my leaping abilities until then. It’s really weird to me that some people think jumping is silly/sillier/less athletic than picking up a heavy object. This is a sentiment that I’ve encountered a few times and I don’t know if it is jealousy or what. I spoke with a weightlifter who explained it like this: “most people would rather dunk a basketball than squat a big weight”. I think he may be right. Haterz gon hate.

Today I did Verkhoshansky's pyramid program: Week 3 Day 1 (easy day)

145x8
180x6
210x5
225x4
245x4
260x3
275x3x3

Step-ups on what I think is 18" (forgot my measuring tape but it comes up to the patellar ligament attachment on my tibia)

135x5x10

4 hours later I did more step-ups

135x10
155x10
175x10
155x10
135x10
155x10
175x10
155x10
135x(???)x10

=>Had to pay for 5 hours of parking at the gym today

But it was all theory-based work. Still, work is work and I managed to sweat out two shirts. Maybe tomorrow or next week I'll lift a barbell or something. Not really looking forward to it honestly. And really I have to get my technique down first so there is no rush. Don't wanna grease the wrong groove or pull a hammy lifting a weight I'm not ready for LOL. Got like 100 hours of DL footage on my DVR so I just gotta hook that shit up with kinovea and run a regression analysis. The results should be very interesting. I will publish them on this website for my esteemed colleagues. I think I also need to examine the literature in greater detail. Reading is fundamental and I have not been keeping up. Using this method I expect to learn 50-100lbs on my (hypothetical) 1RM DL or maybe even more. There really is no limit to human potential and the power of the mind in particular.

On a serious note my quads are already feeling sore from earlier today (not a DOMS feeling more like “unusable”, “dead”). Ass not so much. Hardly ever get soreness there – what a humiliating injury – apart from paralysis and muscle wasting I have to talk about how sore my ass gets on a daily basis. It’s a pain in the ass.
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